Agile Architectures: Versatility meets Plasticity

Synopsis

At enterprise level agility can be understood as a mix of versatility and plasticity, the former an attribute of function, the latter of form:

  • Versatility: enterprise ability to perform different activities in changing environments without having to change its architectures.
  • Plasticity: enterprise ability to change its architectures without affecting its performances.
Plasticity is for form, versatility for function

Agility: Forms & Performances (P. Pénicaud)

Combining versatility and plasticity requires a comprehensive and consistent view of assets (architectures) and modus operandi (processes) organized with regard to change. And that can be achieved with model based systems engineering (MBSE).

MBSE & Change

Agility is all about change, and if enterprise governance is not to be thrown aside decision-making has to be supported by knowledgeable descriptions of enterprise objectives, assets, and organization.

If change management is to be the primary objective, targets must be classified along two main distinctions:

  • Actual (business context and organization) or symbolic (information systems).
  • Objects (business entities or system surrogates) or activities (business processes or logic).
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Comprehensive and consistent descriptions of actual and symbolic assets (architectures) and modus operandi (processes) with regard to change management.

The two axis determine four settings supporting transparency and traceability:

  • Dependencies between operational and structural elements.
  • Dependencies between actual assets and processes and their symbolic representation as systems surrogates.

Versatility and plasticity will be obtained by managing changes and alignments between settings.

Changes & Alignments

Looking for versatility, changes in users’ requirements must be rapidly taken into account by applications (changes from actual to symbolic).

Looking for plasticity, changes in business objectives are meant to be supported by enterprise capabilities (changes from operational to structural).

The challenge is to ensure that both threads can be weaved together into business functions and realized by services (assuming a service oriented architecture).

With the benefits of MBSE, that could be carried out through a threefold alignment:

  • At users level the objective is to ensure that applications are consistent with business logic and provide the expected quality of service. That is what requirements traceability is meant to achieve.
  • At system level the objective is to ensure that business functions and features can be directly mapped to systems functionalities. That is what services oriented architectures (SOA) are  meant to achieve.
  • At enterprise level the objective is to ensure that the enterprise capabilities are congruent with its business objectives, i.e that they support its business processes through an effective use of assets. That is what maturity and capability models are meant to achieve.
Alignment

Versatility comes from users’ requirements, plasticity from architectures capabilities.

That would make agility a concrete endeavor across enterprise, from business users and applications to business processes and architectures capabilities.

Further Reading

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